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HS0ZHK Thailand flag Thailand

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QSL: VIA BUREAU / CLUB RAST THAILAND

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Ham Member Lookups: 10308

 

Hello and thank you for visiting my QRZ.COM page,

valid for DJ2EI and HS0ZHK !

Station in Thailand:

ROCKWELL-COLLINS KWM-380 with 40 W power out in Digi-modes

Antenna is a simple 14 meters high vertical on ground with SGS-230 auto-tuner

 

My way to Ham - Radio and beyond :

In summer 1956, as a young 12 years old boy, I was allowed to have a look and climb into a HANOMAG Radio Van from the West-German Border Police BGS (Bundesgrenzschutz), which was operating on a small hill during an exercise in the vincinity of Munich, Germany !

For the first time in my life I saw radio equipment, heard Morse Code signals out of a receiver and was allowed to press the Morse Key even I did not know the code.

This was an very impressing experience and I have been very much excited and immediately radio-crazy and bitten by the "radio bug" !

A few months later in early 1957 (at age 13), I started being interested in HAM-RADIO with a German ex-Military WWII surplus receiver "Torn. E. b", which I could buy for 5 Deutsche Mark, that time equal to US$ 1,20 ! Lucky to have an ex-Luftwaffe Funker (German Air-Force LN "Luft-Nachrichtentruppe" radio-operator) available as instructor for Morse-code, basic electronics and many military equipment (e.g. Torn. E. b, KW Anton, E 52 Koeln, FuG 10 Aircraft Radio Set, Radione R3) and even for cryptography (ENIGMA, ADFGXV, "paper and pencil", Caesar Code, Tarntafel etc.) for the next three years, I collected extensive knowledge and experience for radio communications and equipment. He was my ELMER and I owe him a huge amount of gratitude !

In 1958 (still going to school) I joined the THW Technisches Hilfswerk (Technical Disaster Aid) and I alone have been the "communications group" in our city, having two LORENZ (banana-like) FuG 6 VHF radios. I have been sent for training on the FuG 7 VHF Command Radio Relay Van to the training school of THW in Wolfratshausen-Geretsried, south of Munich. In September 1961 I finished my voluntary membership with THW, because

in October 1961 (not even 18 years old) I joined the German Bundeswehr Signal Corps. After a 3 months Basic Infantry Training at a location near the Czech border I have been transferred to 3.(FuKp)/FmBtl 4 (which was the first FmBtl of the new Bundeswehr established in July 1956) in "Raffler Kaserne" in Regensburg. There I have been intensively trained on the old US WWII HF CW and AM radio equipment SCR-506, SCR-193 and the newer AN/GRC-9 with LV-80 PA as well as the US AN/PRC 8-10 and AN/GRC 3-8 FM radio family from the 1950s for 3 months.

There I saw one of the BGS HANOMAG radio vans again and I learned that it was a "BGS Funktrupp M", a "Germanized" US SCR-193, in Germany known as "BGS FuG 4". It is consisting of a BC-348 receiver and a BC-191 transmitter refurbished by "STEG", painted in light-grey color and with labels in German language. When the German Army was established in 1956, BGS members could transfer to the Bundeswehr and they even brought a lot of their equipment with them, in this case the radio trucks. We also had a second SCR-193 set-up as a fixed radio station in our barracks serving in a NATO CW Radio Net. There I also worked some night-shifts "on duty". After 6 years I was literally back to my beginnings !

BGS FuG 4, see picture below !

My first "hands-on" to RTTY (or RATT) was in March 1962 with the good old US WWII AN/GRC-26C and AN/GRC-26D shelters on a 5 tons MAN truck with heavy, oily and noisy mechanical TELETYPE and KLEINSCHMIDT "steam-teleprinters", COLLINS R-388 and R-390 receivers, the CV-116 and CV-182 RTTY demodulators as well as the BC-610 and T-368 transmitters with 500 watts output power.

My first "hands-on" to cryptography with the complicated sweat-producing "Reihenschieber-Handschluessel" and the HELL H-54 "Kaffee-Muehle" (coffee-grinder, see: www.cryptomuseum.com/crypto/hell/h54/index.htm ) was in January 1962 in this Signal Corps unit. In fall 1962 I have been transferred to 3. FmLBtl at the School of Communications and Electronics in Feldafing at Lake Starnberg, south of Munich, specializing in RTTY and Cryptography !

In addition to the old US WWII HF RTTY equipment (which I had great fun to work on), we now had the new developed mobile 100 W and 400 W RTTY systems, "Made in Germany".

The 100 W system in a UNIMOG van consisted of a SIEMENS E-309 receiver with the FSE-1300 RTTY demodulator and T-100 teleprinter and a R&S SK-010 transmitter as well as a small TELEFUNKEN R-77 monitoring receiver which we mainly used to listen to Rock'n Roll music of RADIO LUXEMBURG on 6090 KHz. The 220 VAC power-generator with a BMW engine was on a two-wheel trailer.

The 400 W system was in a 3tons FORD truck shelter (which was soon changed to a 5tons MAN truck, because the FORD was not powerful enough to carry the weight of the equipment in the shelter !!!) and consisted of two SIEMENS E-311 receivers with the excellent PFITZNER TG-440B RTTY demodulators and the older SIEMENS T-37 teleprinters and a R&S SK-050 transmitter as well as a SIEMENS/HELL KF-108 Kleinfax. Also here the 220 VAC power-generator with a BMW engine was on a two-wheel trailer.

That time there was no SSB radio equipment yet, the French THOMSON CSF ERB-281 HF-SSB radio set came later. The VHF-RTTY system with the SEM-25, a WT-1 MODEM and a SIEMENS T-100 teleprinter in a UNIMOG van also came later.

I served in the Bundeswehr as instructor for CW, RTTY and Cryptography until end of September 1964 !

The picture above showing me typing on a T-100 teleprinter was taken in summer 1964 inside a 100 W RTTY UNIMOG van.

Since that time I am hooked on RTTY ! I like very much to "talk with my fingers" and I have been very much fascinated to work with "real" cryptography.

End of 1964 I received my license with call-sign "DJ2EI" and I am active in "steam-RTTY" since then. I bought my first teleprinter, a used Siemens T-37h, end of 1964 and hooked it to a home-made "Twin-City" demodulator with tubes. Receiver was a HAMMARLUND BC-1004 and transmitter a HEATHKIT DX-100 which I modified for FSK. I built 5 or 6 "Twin-Cities" with a tuning-scope using LB-8 cathode-ray tubes from the German WWII WUERZBURG RADAR. After the uA709 IC appeared I built at least 25 "ST-5" demodulators as well as several "DJ6HP-001 series" boards. Later I went QRV in almost all Digi Modes with SSB equipment, especially AMTOR since the beginning of the 80's with a MKII board first, then an AMT-1 and AMT-2, then PACTOR 1 since it appeared in 1991 with the PTC-1 board (which I integrated into a military MODEM) and also a PACTOR 1 software (made by Tom, HB9JNX) used with an external MODEM, a "DSPCOM" MODEM for CW, RTTY, AMTOR and PACTOR 1, FELDHELL and PSK since 2000 and now ROS MODE since 2011 with sound-card.

I owned several SIEMENS FSE-30 and FSE-401 demodulators, which I modified for audio input instead of normally IF 30 KHz ! In addition I had the FEC-100 and ARQ-1000 units. Now I also have the SIEMENS CHX-200F1 MODEM. From TELEFUNKEN I had the TgFs-127 Demodulator plus the Antenna-Diversity-Unit ! From Pfitzner I had the TG-440B and the TG-44 ! Several CFA demodulators from Northern Radio, U.S.A. from the 50's as well as the CV-278/GR of the GRC-46 RTTY shelter !

I collected many different teleprinters over the years and had a nice collection with more than 70 models, many exotic like the TELETYPE Model 28 ASR with 3-speed gearshift, 28 KSR and RO and the small "compact" version, the Model 32 Baudot and 33 ASCII, Models 35, 37 and 38 ASCII, even the Teletype Model 40 TEMPEST (hundreds of IC's on many many PCB's) with monitor screen and high-speed chain-printer (used mainly for crypto-applications), as well as the electronic ASCII Model 43, which I converted to BAUDOT code with a PCB with an E-PROM. Also had the very heavy (45 kilograms) military two-man load AN/UGC-74B made by HONEYWELL with a chain-printer, the Siemens T-150 first "hand-carved" laboratory model and a Siemens T-1000 with the very rare magnetic-cassette-tape attachment, a HASLER SP-300, SAGEM SP-20, OLIVETTI T2CN and TE-300, a PHILIPS PACT 220 (which was the basic for the Bundeswehr FS-200Z/FS-220Z produced by TE-KA-DE) as well as a MITE AN/TGC-14A(V) portable miniature teleprinter in a fiberglass case and with 24VDC motor ! I also had a version for use in airplanes with aluminum case and 110 VAC 400 Hz motor. And a very rare MITE attache-case 110 Bd ASCII terminal with a horizontal type-cylinder, moved by many strong solenoids, wheels and thin steel-wires and springs - no motor !

I owned many different receivers and transceivers (come and go...) from WWII era, both US (BC-342 and BC-348, RCA AR-88, HAMMARLUND SP-600, NATIONAL HRO, SCR-506, AN/GRR-5, ECHOPHONE EC-1B etc.) and German Wehrmacht (several different Torn E b versions, Torn Fu b1, Torn Fu d2, FuG 10 aircraft radio, UKW E e, Radione R-2 and R-3 etc.) ! And sure many from the "Vietnam era" and later like AN/GRC-9 with LV-80, AN/GRC-19, Collins KWM-2A, COLLINS R-388 and R-390, HARRIS RF-230 and RF-301, TMC GPR-90 and a rare HAMMARLUND PRO-310 from the 50's etc. to mention only a few. Many receivers, transmitters and transceivers made by Siemens (E-309, E-310, E-311, E-401, E 410, FuG 100, CHR-531, CHR-532, CHX-240), Telefunken (E-127, E-724, E-1200, E-1501) and Rohde&Schwarz (EK-07D, EK-070, SK-010) and a REDIFON FuG 15 SSB-transceiver with FuV-100 RF-Amplifier (used by the BGS) followed with the years.

After my service in the Bundeswehr I stayed in the radio, RTTY and cryptology business (for Military, Special Forces, Intelligence Services etc. and Foreign Affairs as well as special applications) for almost all the time until retirement. During that time I have been sent to several Crypto and Radio Equipment manufacturers for training and also travelled around the globe for many years to give training lessons to the users of the equipment.

Please see:

http://www.cryptomuseum.com/manuf/tst/files/tst_brochure.pdf    and

http://www.cryptomuseum.com/manuf/tst/index.htm#ref

In 1975  I built a "Vernam tape-mixer" (Lochstreifen-Mischer) with two Siemens electronic tape reader heads and XOR logic IC's,  just to prove that it is working as it should. The cipher-text output was sent to a FACIT 4070 paper-tape punch. 

I am "very familiar" with the "RS-6" Spy radio set, several "mini receivers", the Wandel & Goltermann and Pfitzner "SP-15" Spy radio set including the "UHU" receiver as well as the Pfitzner/TELEFUNKEN "SP-20" units and finally the "HARPOON" system SY-5000 / FS-5000 from TELEFUNKEN with built-in crypto using High-Speed-Digital-Data-Bursts and not the traditional Morse-Code anymore. 

I am familiar with several HARRIS and COLLINS HF radios and many different Voice and Data Crypto-units of "Western origin", military and civilian versions.

I am also familiar with the US military RATT systems AN/GRC-46 (with GRC-19), AN/GRC-122 and AN/GRC-142 (with GRC-106) as well as the KW-7 crypto unit.

After the "fall of the wall" in 1989 I collected extensive knowledge on ex-GDR (east Germany, DDR) RFT Funkwerk Koepenik radio equipment and owned e.g. EKD-100, EKD-300, EKD-500, EZ-100 RTTY demodulator / preselector and especially SEG-15D and SEG-100D HF-SSB transceivers (which I modifierd for use up to 14,5 MHz) as well as RFT electronic teleprinters F 1200, F 1500 and F 2000. Also Russian Warshaw Pact equipment like R-130 and R-134 HF transceiver, R-4, R-5, R-155, R-326, R-396K HF RDF receiver as well as R-350, R-353, R-354 and R-394 "Special Forces Radios" and the Yugoslavian RU-20, which is actually a COLLINS PRC-515.

And sure I also collected knowledge of the Crypto equipment used in the WARSAW PACT like the FIALKA and several paper-tape mixers etc.

For the HAM-RADIO hobby, main activities have been (and still are) home-construction of RTTY MODEM's etc. as well as modification, testing and use of ex-Military and Spy radio equipment for the hobby...

 

Even after now almost 60 years I won't forget this view :

This is the BGS Funktrupp M in a HANOMAG truck, a US SCR-193 modified by STEG for use with West-German Border-Police and later Bundeswehr Signal Corps units!

 

The picture below shows a TE KA DE "FS-200Z" electronic teleprinter, based on the PHILIPS PACT 220 with a dot-matrix printhead. "Made in Germany" in the 1980's for the Bundeswehr !

 

This picture shows a TELEFUNKEN "HARPOON FS-5000 High-Speed Digital Data HF Radio Set" also "Made in Germany" with home-made DSU frequency input module and modified for Morse-Code !

 

No more electro-mechanical like the ENIGMA, no more pure mechanical like the HELL H-54 or the US M-209 ! This is more modern Crypto equipment TST-3010 from the 1980's ! Fully electronic, NSC-800 processor-controlled, LCD 1x40 char. with thermo-printer unit and of course "proudly Made in Germany" !

 

"AGENTENFUNK" Historian (Spy- and Clandestine Radio Equipment)...

"CRYPTO-Equipment" Historian...

 

Being around the world for business reasons for long time, I have been active also as:

9H3T, W9/DJ2EI, DU3TOR, 4E1EI, and some more....

Active from Thailand as HS0ZHK since 2007...

German callsign DJ2EI is still valid but I am NOT QRV from Germany !!

 

Member of:

Feldhell #FH1733

30MDG #1835

DMC #1909

EPC #11198

ERC #0758 (European ROS Club)

MRR #175 (Military Radio Runde)

Livetime member of "RAST" Radio Amateur Society of Thailand

 

QSL cards please via club / bureau "RAST" Thailand or direct to:

HS0ZHK - Jim -

PO. Box 2008

Bangkok 10501

THAILAND

 

1867438 Last modified: 2015-04-12 14:39:09, 19997 bytes

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