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Ham Member Lookups: 22033

 

The photo of my shack was taken on January 12, 2017. It is always this messy as it is also my work space. I am working as a writer and always doing something. Not much time for cleaning. Grin! That is the correct temperature -12F (-24C). You can see the Flex 6500 and the ICOM 7100. Yes, that is a Trilobite on top of the Flex. A bit of old technology from over 250 million years ago on top of one of the newest technology. Two of my novels are still available at Amazon in the Kindle format if you are interested.

 

My start in amateur radio dates back to 1953 when I was only 12. It wasn’t until I was 15 and 16 that I found a local ham willing to give me the Novice test. I was really dense when it came to learning code at first. As I remember it, there were only samples of what the questions might be in the Novice exam. I did very well in that area because I was very interested in electronics. It was finally decided I would take the novice test, but my father announced a promotion in his company and we’d be moving to Toronto Canada. That ended my quest for the novice license, but there was time before we would move and I would go over to my friend station. He would let me chat on CW with his friends. My speed dramatically improved before we moved. I knew I could’ve easily passed the general class license code test.

It wasn’t until 20 years later that I got a chance to return to amateur radio. Much happened in between. At that time, high schools in Ontario where Toronto is located had a grade 13. I did not want to go another whole year in high school, so I came back to the States and finished high school while living with my grandparents. After that it was college and the Army and a tour in Vietnam. I got married while I was in the Army and a wife with the family on the way meant amateur radio got put off once again. It wasn’t until the mid-70s that I got my novice license and then quickly went down to the FCC offices in Philadelphia and passed my General and Advanced Class licenses. My code speed that time was at best 15 or 16 words per minute, so I passed on taking the Extra test. I could’ve probably passed the written test because I was working for the University of Pennsylvania at the Moore School of Electrical Engineering at a postdoctoral lab near Valley Forge Pennsylvania. My original Novice call was KN3WVT which soon became WA3WVT. My current call KCØEM was given to me when I moved to Minnesota in 1979. It is a great CW call, so I have never seen the need to get a vanity license.

 

My interests in amateur radio has always been technical in nature. I saw the coming of direct sampling radios while still working at the University of Pennsylvania. We tend to call them SDR radios in the hobby. My current rig is a Flex 6500. Most of my time on the air is spent using WSJT-X programs now. The Flex is ideal for this because it does away with the extra wiring and cabling that was necessary with my FT 920.

 

 

 

 

 

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8475919 Last modified: 2017-11-26 16:28:11, 4849 bytes

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United States Counties Award#5074
Granted: 2016-10-27 14:00:03   (KC0EM)

Endorsements:
  • 250 Counties Mixed
  • 100 Counties Mixed
World Continents Award#15660
Granted: 2016-10-27 14:00:02   (KC0EM)

Endorsements:
  • 15 Meters Mixed
  • 17 Meters Mixed
  • 20 Meters Mixed
Grid Squared Award#14224
Granted: 2016-10-27 14:00:02   (KC0EM)

Endorsements:
  • 15 Meters Mixed
  • 17 Meters Mixed
  • 20 Meters Mixed
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