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I was first licensed in 1955 as WN3EPM. 1955 was the second renewal of ham licenses after WWII and the FCC had a huge backlog. It was about 60 days from the time I took my novice exam until I received my license. During that time my Elmer, Jules, W3RTV, loaned me a TG-34A code keyer. This was a code practice machine that used a paper tape passing over a photo cell. By the time I received my novice ticket I was copying code at 45++ WPM and totally hooked on CW! When I finally got on the air I found the 15 meter novice band and had a ball working DX. I still remember some of the chats I had with FA8RJ and VQ2GW.

After hearing many stories about the difficulty copying code at the Pittsburgh FCC office my Dad decided I should see Washington DC and while we were there I could try for my general at the FCC office in the old Post Office Building. Not only did I enjoy seeing Washington but I passed my general exam.

WN3EPM, 1955. National NC-183 Receiver, Stancore ST202A Transmitter

Like many new generals I spent a lot of time on 80 and 40 meters in traffic nets. John Wojtkiewicz, W3GJY and Dick Young W3PZW were some of my early mentors that shaped my cw operating habits.

We moved to Arizona in 1957 and I became K7KIY. Arizona truly is a black hole for RF! Moved to Texas in 1962 and was issued W5LUJ. I was fairly active and had to start DXCC all over again. Went to work for Texas Instruments in Dallas, TX as a Field Engineer supporting Airborne Radar and Infrared systems. Spent five years in Vietnam and Thailand. Was mostly inactive during this time. In 1970 I was reassigned to Germany where I was DL4BT – back on the air again. Returned to Dallas in 1972 and was finally able to settle down and build a decent station.

I was a member of the Richardson Wireless Klub, K5RWK. A truly great bunch of contesters and Dxers. Too many good operators to name but one that really stood out was Joe Johnson, W5QBM. Joe was a contester and always had a group of young operators at his QTH to learn about and participate in contests.

I was issued W5XJ in 1977. A great call for CW. I retired from Texas Instruments in 1995 and we moved to Puerto Rico. I was issued NP3G and the YL Karen was NP3F. Really great fun operating from the Caribbean. Over 300 countries in just 6 years.

We moved to Florida in 2002 where I became N4TB and Karen is W4JA.

W5XJ – 1982 Pair of Collins KWS-1 and 75A4

N4TB SO2R contest station – 2007

The current station is a Elecraft K3 with the KPA500 Amp. P3 with VGA Monitor. The second radio is a Yeasu FT-1000 MP Mark V Field. With a Ten Tec Titan Amp.

MicroHam Micro2r SO2R controller, HB band decoders, HB 2 X 6 Antenna switch

Antennas: Two towers 100 feet apart, 60 feet and 70 feet

160 Meters – Inverted “L” with 70 feet vertical

80 Meters: Inverted Vee with the apex at 70 feet

40 Meters: HB Rotary dipole at 80 feet

30 Meters: Delta loop at 60 feet

20 Meters: HyGain 204BA at 70 feet

15 Meters: 4 ele HB yagi at 70 feet

10 Meters: 5 ele HyGain yagi at 60 feet

6 Meters: 6 ele Boomer yagi at 65 feet

Enjoy reparing and refurbishing HyGain HAM series and T2X Rotators

Other interests: Gardening, Scuba Diving (PADI Instructor), Bicycling

73, Terry, N4TB,  Looking forward to seeing you on the bands

 

8013156 Last modified: 2017-04-05 13:43:48, 5163 bytes

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